Bumil's Skin Care & Treatment - Do's and Dont's
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    Default Bumil's Skin Care & Treatment - Do's and Dont's

    secara gw lagi hamil anak ke-3 Hidden Content (Alhamdulillah) jadi kayaknya gw concernnya sama skin treatment/care nya bumil nih....apalagi skrg udah ada FD forum...duh kayaknya bakalan nambah ilmu deh.
    sharing dong pengetahuannya, kira-kira produk apa yang bagus dan AMAN buat bumil treatment, terutama di perut dan stretch mark hehehe....
    pokoknya yang berhubungan dengan perawatan bumil deh, dari mulai muka, tubuh, spa yang bagus dimana...biar bisa rileks menghadapi kelahiran nantinya gituhhh....
    sorry bu mod udah bener belom ya threadnya? silahkan direvisi kalo kurang tepat Hidden Content

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    Elite Citizen bungajeruk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    Ohh...perawatan buat ibu hamil tokh ? Aku kirain ingredients skincare yg harus dihindari ibu semasa hamil...atau itu termasuk juga ? *nanya dulu deh ketimbah OT* Hidden Content
    "Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky" - Rabindranath Tagore

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    Permanent Resident Ecie's Avatar
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    semua info bisa berguna kok bungjer sayang Hidden Content

    niz kl gw sih (skrg lg hamil 5 bln anak 1) skincare yg biasanya gw pake sementara gw tinggal dulu soalnya byk mengandung zat yg ga boleh utk bumil....
    utk perawatan muka gw campur aduk antara biotherm, estee lauder ama bodyshop....
    kl utk perut ato strectmark gw lbh milih pake shea body butter-nya bodyshop dibanding cream khusus stretchmark bumil...
    utk perawatan spa/message sih gw waktu itu pernah tau infonya ada di moms n jo spa tempatnya di dharmawangsa square... harganya sih beragam tergantung jenis perawatannya... mulai dari 250 rb sampe jutaan kl ga salah....
    gw sih blom coba sementara masih rutin di message n luluran ama org langganan yg biasa dipanggil kermh...
    I love being married... It's so great to find that one special person you want to annoy for the rest of your life....

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    Superstar in Training aubrey's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    pengen share....

    Skin Care Ingredients and Supplements Pregnant or Nursing Women Should Not Use

    Recently, I received an e-mail from a reader asking me if a skin care product was safe for her to use while she was pregnant or nursing. First and foremost, I am not a physician yet; therefore, you should speak to your primary care physician, obstetrician-gynecologist and/or dermatologist with regards to these types of questions. However, I was a bit alarmed by the dearth of information available to pregnant and nursing women online with regards to their skin care products and supplements. After doing some research, I decided to write an article supplying this type of information. I found that one or more licensed dermatologists and experts have recommended that women stop using or doing the following while pregnant or nursing:

    Accutane (orally administered)

    Accutane (isotretinoin) is a derivative of vitamin A commonly prescribed to patients with acne. According to the Organization of Teratology Information Services (OTIS), women who take Accutane during the first twelve weeks of pregnancy risk severe birth defects. These include severe fetal brain and heart defects, mental retardation, and other birth abnormalities. The correlation is strong, with one in four babies exposed to Accutane drug during the first trimester of pregnancy experiencing severe side effects. Fortunately, according to a 1995 survey in the New England Journal of Medicine, 99 percent of 177,216 women prescribed Accutane recalled being instructed to avoid pregnancy. Women who are taking Accutane and plan to become pregnant are advised by OTIS to stop using the product one month before trying to get pregnant, to be absolutely sure that the product is gone from the bloodstream.

    Retin-A, Avita, Renova (topical treatments)
    Retin-A, Avita, and Renova all contain tretinoin, like Accutane. All are topical treatments that are commonly prescribed to improve acne, hyperpigmentation, wrinkles, and skin texture. Each contains between 0.025-0.1% tretinoin and is applied to the skin, whereas Accutane is 10-40 mg of orally administered isotretinoin (USPharmacist.com). A 2002 study by Briggs et. al. cited here estimated that even if maximal absorption (about 33%) occurred from a daily application of 1 g of a 1% tretinoin preparation, a patient would receive only one-seventh of the vitamin A activity from a typical prenatal vitamin supplement. A further study by Lancet et. al. in 1993 affirmed this opinion, concluding that “topical tretinoin is not associated with an increased risk for major congenital disorders.” Still, despite the research otherwise, the Organization of Teratology Information Services (OTIS) says that is “a safe approach” for women to stop using Retin-A one month before trying to get pregnant.

    …What about retinoids (retinol, retinyl palmitate) in over-the-counter topical treatments?

    A 1999 review by G. Reis and R. Hess concluded that the form of retinoids commonly used in cosmetic products should be safe for use during pregnancy and while nursing. This is due in part because of the topical, rather than oral, administration of the drug. Another reason is that retinol and retinyl palmitate have about one-twentieth the potency of tretinoin (Lupo). This is because retinol and retinyl palmitate must first be converted to retinaldehyde, and then all-trans retinoic acid, in order to be effective. Therefore, based on the literature, it seems that topical treatments with retinol and retinyl palmitate should be safe. However, if you feel safer and can do without your cosmetic products with retinol and retinyl palmitate for nine months, then please do so.

    Skin Care Supplements Containing Vitamin A (orally administered)
    Skin care supplements often contain vitamin A. According to The Teratology Society, the USRDA (U.S. recommended daily allowance) of 8,000 IU/day during pregnancy has been established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as the standard. Dietary surveys in the U.S., however, have defined that the average unsupplemented adult diet contains 7,000–8,000 IU/day of vitamin A (Russell-Briefel et al., ‘85). Because a higher instance of birth defects have been found in babies whose mothers consumed more than 10000 IU/day of vitamin A, and at least seven case reports of adverse pregnancy outcome associated with a daily intake of vitamin A of 25,000 IU or more have been published (Rosa et al., ‘86), women should consider their total dietary intake of vitamin A before taking vitamin A supplements. One further caveat: do not over-limit vitamin A, as retinol deficiency during pregnancy has been associated with anemia and other health problems. Further, one 1999 study of about 300 women did not find a link between consumption of about 50000 IU/day vitamin A and birth defects, but the current scientific literature overall seems to recommend about 8,000 IU/day during pregnancy, and ideally no more than 10,000 IU/day. If you are confused about your vitamin A intake, write down the foods and supplements you consume during a typical week, and ask your doctor or nutritionist.

    Too much sun avoidance

    Vitamin D deficiencies in pregnant women have been associated with the development of multiple sclerosis in babies (Chaudhuri). In addition, prolonged exclusive breastfeeding without vitamin D supplementation is one of the most significant causes of the reemergence of rickets (NIH). A 2007 study from the University of Pittsburgh found that both black and white women in North America are “at high risk” for vitamin D insufficiencies, even when taking prenatal vitamins. Therefore, pregnant women should spend sunscreen-free time in the sun to acquire adequate levels of vitamin D. According to Dr. Michael Holick of Boston University, standing outside sunscreen-free between the hours of 10 A.M. and 4 P.M. for fifteen minutes a day three times a week lets the skin produce enough vitamin D for most of the year. (Expose your face, arms, hands, and back.) Since CNCA.com reports that pregnant women should get the same amount of vitamin D as non-pregnant women, 400 IU, spending fifteen minutes sunscreen-free three days a week should be enough. Interestingly, too much sun is unlikely to create an excess of vitamin D, but too much vitamin D via supplement can. Excessive vitamin D levels have been associated with nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, constipation, weakness, weight loss, and calcinosis, the deposition of calcium and phosphate in the body’s soft tissues such as the kidney. Therefore, when pregnant or nursing, try to spend more sunscreen-free time in the sun, and take a vitamin D supplement, but keep total vitamin D from food and supplements below 50 micrograms, or 2000 IU.

    Sunscreens containing avobenzone or oxybenzone

    Before I continue any farther, I want to state first that no studies have been shown that avobenzone or oxybenzone are very toxic. In fact, a 2005 study by Hayden et. al. demonstrated that the ingredients are not harmful when applied to the skin. However, avobenzone and oxybenzone (the latter present in 20-30% of sunscreens) have been demonstrated by Hayden et. al to be absorbed into the body and secreted into the urine of users. According to Dr. Leslie Baumann, director of Cosmetic Dermatology at the University of Miami, “Oxybenzone has low acute toxicity in animal studies, yet little is known about its chronic toxicity and disposition after its topical application in people. For this reason, sunscreens containing this agent are not recommended for use in children.” And, again, although maximal absorption of a topical ingredient from the skin is about 33%, it is probably a safe approach to use sunscreens without avobenzone or oxybenzone during pregnancy or while nursing. A safe alternative is a sunscreen containing zinc oxide with its photoreactivity minimized by surface coating with dimethicone or silicone, such as Blue Lizard Australian Sunscreen, SPF 30 ($12.99, Drugstore.com).

    Salicyclic Acid
    [Thanks to a reader, this was added November 12, 2007.] Salicyclic acid has been shown in high doses of the oral form to cause birth defects and various pregnancy complications. However, small amounts applied to the skin — such as a salicylic acid-containing toner used once or twice a day — are considered safe, says Sandra Marchese Johnson, a dermatologist with Johnson Dermatology in Fort Smith, Arkansas. But the concern is stronger about face and body peels, which contain higher concentrations of salicylic acid. “This kind of ’soaking’ in the ingredient is similar to taking one or more aspirin when pregnant,” she explains. According to BabyCenter.com, your best bet is to consult your dermatologist about any products you are using containing salicyclic acid, and to avoid ingesting any supplements containing salicyclic acid or BHA (beta hydroxy acid; salicyclic acid is a BHA).

    Just for you: Avoid soy that is not “active soy”, or oil of bergamot

    [Thanks to a reader, this was added November 12, 2007.] Many women experience a darkening of the skin during pregnancy (”the mask of pregnancy”) that is caused by overactive melanin production. According to BabyCenter.com, soy-containing products and oil of bergamot have estrogenic effects, which can make this form of melasma (darkening of the skin) worse. However, products by Johnson & Johnson brands (i.e., Neutrogena, Aveeno, amongst others) contain a form of soy known as “active soy,” in which the estrogenic compounds have been extracted, so these should not exacerbate melasma like other products.

    dr futurederm
    esio: aubrey, gw mulai percaya thread yang kamu datangi selalu jadi laris manis...
    lena: tapi bener juga sih

  5. #5
    Superstar in Training aubrey's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    lanjutan Hidden Content

    In summary…

    Based on the scientific research available, while pregnant or nursing, it is vital to alter your skin care regime so that it does not include Accutane, to avoid taking supplements containing salicyclic acid or BHA, and to get at least fifteen minutes of sunscreen-free sun exposure at peak times of the day (10 A.M.-4 P.M.) three times a week to get adequate vitamin D, or talk to your doctor about a proper supplement. You should also avoid using products containing oil of bergamot or soy (although “active soy” is safe) to avoid the development of dark patches on the skin.

    To be on the safe side, stop use of Retin-A one month before trying to become pregnant, stop using peels and acne treatments containing salicyclic acid, and be cautious about vitamin A supplements while pregnant or nursing.

    To be extremely cautious while pregnant or nursing, stop using skin care products containing retinol or retinyl palmitate and stop using sunscreens containing oxybenzone or avobenzone.

    And, again, I cannot stress this enough: speak to your primary care physician, obstetrician-gynecologist and/or dermatologist about any concerns you may have. Also, if you have anything to add to this article, please feel free to contact me at futurederm [at] gmail.com.
    esio: aubrey, gw mulai percaya thread yang kamu datangi selalu jadi laris manis...
    lena: tapi bener juga sih

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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    kalo ini SAFE SKIN CARE DURING PREGNANCY
    Hidden Content
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    ??? ga boleh pake BHA selama pregnant?
    kalo itu benar, gila bisa ancur kulit gue if the day comes! Hidden Content

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    Superstar in Training sLesTa's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    crescent you'll never know.. sometimes the hormone during pregnancy helps to clear up your skin.. tapi ya itu untuk case2 tertentu sih, ada yang justru malah bikin parah. kalo gue kemaren untungnya ga masalah di skin tuh..

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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    cres that's why skrg gw lg di puncak frustasi ama kulit gw secara jerawatan mulu.... krn gw hindarin acne treatment for a while....
    I love being married... It's so great to find that one special person you want to annoy for the rest of your life....

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    duh thanks yah buat infonya.....Hidden Content

  11. #11
    Beryl putri_bramantyo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    Ya ampun, emang deh FD paling top! panjang umur banget, aku lagi nyari skin treatment during pregnancy, kayaknya banyak yang complain soal kulit jerawatan, amannya pake perawatan apa ya? info pls, siapa tau aku hamil beneran (masih 50/50 antara pms apa hamil beneran,huh).

    echie, (lagi ngelus2 perut lo), siapa tau ketularan hamil, amiiiiiiiiin!

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    Superstar in Training aubrey's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    nanya dudulz aja neh secara jerawat kan berhubungan dng hormon... jenis kelamin anak merupakan salah satu faktor penentu jd jerawatan apa kaga selama hamil ga seh?
    esio: aubrey, gw mulai percaya thread yang kamu datangi selalu jadi laris manis...
    lena: tapi bener juga sih

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    Hidden Content

    Safe skin care during pregnancy

    Most pregnant women know that what they put (or don't put) in their bodies is important to the well-being of their growing baby, whether it's the right kind of protein, too much caffeine, or certain types of fish. But many pregnant women might not know that what they put on their bodies is just as important.

    Most of us slather on oceans of lotions every day, but we don't think about what might be passing the skin barrier and being absorbed into our bodies. With a developing baby in your belly, this is a vital concern.

    "Everything you eat, apply, or come into contact with may affect not only you but also your baby," says Sandra Marchese Johnson, a dermatologist with Johnson Dermatology in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

    "Because some topical ingredients get absorbed into the bloodstream, there are some you want to avoid," adds Leslie Baumann, a professor of dermatology at the University of Miami and author of The Skin Type Solution (Bantam, 2006).

    The more powerful and targeted products get, the more we need to be careful about what we have in our skin-care regimens during pregnancy. While most commonly used products are completely safe, there's a handful of ingredients considered potentially harmful to a growing baby. Below, see our guide to what to look for when shopping the beauty aisle.

    If you plan to breastfeed, adds Johnson, continue following the guidelines noted below until you stop nursing.

    Retinoids

    These powerful substances, found in some antiaging moisturizers, are lauded for helping reduce wrinkles and improve skin tone. Retinoids are a type of vitamin A that speeds up cell division (quickening your skin's renewal) and prevent skin collagen from breaking down.

    But retinoids are one of the skin-care ingredients that experts, including Baumann, recommend that expectant moms stay away from. Some studies have shown that high doses of vitamin A during pregnancy can be harmful to an unborn child. And oral retinoids, such as isotretinoin (Accutane, an acne treatment), are known to cause birth defects.

    If you've been using a skin cream that contains a retinoid, don't panic. Retinoids have not been shown to cause problems in their topical form in pregnant women.

    "There is no data to show these retinoids ingredients are harmful when used on the skin doctors are just being extra cautious," explains Baumann.

    On the label:
    Differin (adapelene)
    Retin-A, Renova (tretinoin)
    Retinoic acid
    Retinol
    Retinyl linoleate
    Retinyl palmitate
    Tazorac and avage (Tazarotene)

    Bottom line:
    Best to avoid

    Salicylic acid

    This mild acid is used to treat certain skin disorders, including acne, and you can find it in a number of skin products, such as cleansers and toners. It can penetrate facial oils to get deep into pores and clean out dead skin cells. Salicylic acid is in the aspirin family, so it can also help reduce inflammation or redness. BHA, or beta hydroxy acid, is a form of salicylic acid and is used in some topical exfoliants to reverse signs of aging.

    But salicylic acid is another no-no for pregnant women. High doses of the acid in its oral form have been shown in studies to cause birth defects and various pregnancy complications.

    Again, doctors are being cautious by recommending that pregnant women avoid the topical use of salicylic acid. Small amounts applied to the skin such as a salicylic acid-containing toner used once or twice a day are considered safe, says Johnson.

    But the concern is stronger about face and body peels containing salicylic acid. "This kind of 'soaking' in the ingredient is similar to taking one or more aspirin when pregnant," she explains.

    "More product used equals more absorption into the bloodstream," adds Baumann. Always check with your doctor before having a peel treatment. Better yet, she advises, if you must have a peel, have it done professionally at your dermatologist's office. A dermatologist will know how to do it safely during pregnancy.

    On the label:
    Salicylic acid
    Beta hydroxy acid
    BHA

    Note: Alpha hydroxy acids, sometimes listed as AHAs, glycolic acid, or lactic acid, are safe.

    Bottom line:
    Best to avoid

    Soy

    Some moms-to-be seek out natural ingredients such as soy in their skin-care products, thinking that they're free from harmful effects. But that's not necessarily the case, says Baumann.

    While soy-based lotions and facial products are generally safe to use, "Soy can make the 'mask of pregnancy' (dark splotches on facial skin) worse, as can oil of bergamot, which is in many organic products," she says.

    Soy has estrogenic effects, which can make those dark patches, also known as melasma or chloasma, worse, Baumann explains. "The 'active soy' found in some product lines is okay, however, because the estrogenic components have been taken out."

    On the label:
    Lethicin
    Phosphatidylcholine
    Soy
    Textured vegetable protein (TVP)

    Bottom line:
    If you have dark skin or melasma, avoid these products, or choose 'active soy' products instead. Otherwise it's safe to use.

    Acne products

    Many women have breakouts in the first trimester because of changing estrogen levels, even if they've always had clear skin. If you're dealing with pregnancy-induced acne, a dermatologist can likely give you a safe topical antibiotic, advises Baumann. You can find a dermatologist in your area through your health insurance company or at the American Academy of Dermatology Web site.

    But if you prefer to avoid yet another doctor appointment, Baumann recommends using a facial wash that contains no more than 2 percent salicylic acid (look for the percentage on the product label). This small amount is considered safe.

    If you want to be doubly sure, ask your obstetrician or midwife before use. As for what to avoid when it comes to treating acne, stay away from leave-on acne lotions, gels, and creams, as well as at-home peels, which can contain salicylic acid or retinoids, says Baumann. And, of course, steer clear of the oral form of the retinoid Accutane.

    On the label:
    Beta hydroxy acid
    BHA
    Differin (adapelene)
    Retin-A, Renova (tretinoin)
    Retinoic acid
    Retinol
    Retinyl linoleate
    Retinyl palmitate
    Salicylic acid
    Tazorac and avage (Tazarotene)
    Tretinoin

    Note: Glycolic acid is an AHA, and safe to use.

    Bottom line:
    Consult your dermatologist, or use mild over-the-counter cleansers only.

    Hair removers & minimizers

    Lotions that remove your hair chemically (depilatories) or that minimize hair between shaves sound like a dream come true when you can barely reach not to mention see your legs. The good news is that these products are considered risk-free.

    "There are no specific ingredients to avoid when it comes to these types of products," says Baumann. "The only risk is an allergy."

    Catherine Lynch, director of the division of general obstetrics and gynecology at the University of South Florida, says, "As long as you use [chemical hair removers] as directed, they shouldn't be a problem. It's a topical solution that isn't absorbed into your bloodstream, so it can't have any effect on the baby."

    If you've had an allergic skin reaction to hair minimizers or removal creams in the past, then you should avoid these products during pregnancy as well.

    Also, some women's skin gets extra sensitive during pregnancy, so you may have a reaction to these ingredients even if you haven't before. Before slathering your whole leg, do a patch test on a small piece of skin behind your knee and wait 24 hours to see if you react.

    On the label:
    Potassium Thioglycolate (depilatory)
    Calcium Thioglycolate (depilatory)
    Sodium Hydroxide (minimizer)
    Sanguisorba Officinalis Root Extract (minimizer)
    Hydrolyzed Soy Protein (minimizer)

    Bottom line:
    Safe to use

    Sunscreens

    Just because you're pregnant doesn't mean you can't hit the beach. In fact, feeling the sand between your toes and that warm breeze in your hair may provide that perfect "relaxation point" your Lamaze instructor has been talking about. And as your mom always told you: Don't forget the sunscreen.

    Sunscreens, including those with ingredients that penetrate the skin, are perfectly safe when you've got your own bun in the oven, says Baumann.

    "[Ingredients] that do go deep into the skin do so in such small concentrations" that they're not worth worrying about, says Johnson. "I personally prefer titanium dioxide and zinc oxide they are powerful physical sunscreens and do not penetrate the skin."

    She adds, "In addition to sunscreen, we advise sun-smart behaviors avoiding the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.; using a sun hat, sunglasses and sun-protective clothing; and reapplying your sunscreen every two hours."

    And if you have melasma, adds Baumann, you can try a UV protector with a skin lightener.

    On the label:
    Titanium dioxide
    Zinc oxide
    Avobenzone (Parsol 1789)
    Oxybenzone
    Dioxybenzone
    Benzophenone
    Octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC)
    Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA)
    Octocrylene

    Bottom line:
    Safe to use
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    Citizen nly80's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    Makeup

    You may not give a second thought to the kind of makeup you use, but even cosmetics are something to consider when pregnant, says dermatologist Johnson.

    Many makeup products are marked "noncomedogenic" or "nonacnegenic" — meaning they're oil-free and don't clog pores. These are safe and will not affect the health of your baby.

    Avoid cosmetics that contain retinol or salicylic acid (found in some makeup for acne-prone skin).

    If you want to be super careful during pregnancy, try some of the minerals-only makeup lines. These products use ingredients that primarily sit on top of the skin and don't cause irritation for most people.

    On the label:
    Differin (adapelene)
    Retin-A, Renova (tretinoin)
    Retinoic acid
    Retinol
    Retinyl linoleate
    Retinyl palmitate
    Tazorac and avage (Tazarotene)
    Tretinoin

    Bottom line:
    Avoid cosmetics that contain retinoids or salicylic acids. Otherwise, safe to use.

    The final word

    When you're pregnant, Baumann says, it's important to discuss any product you use on your skin with your healthcare provider.

    But if you realize you have used a product that contains one of the potentially harmful ingredients noted above, don't panic, says Johnson. Simply stop using the product now and pick one with known-to-be-safe ingredients.

    "Most over-the-counter products by reputable brands are safe," she says. "And if you are applying these products to less than 10 percent of your total skin surface, the risks of systemic effects are very low."
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    Citizen nly80's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bumil's Skin Treatment

    putri_bramantyo : dr article di atas ada tuh pembahasan ttg jerawat & safe acne treatment nya Hidden Content
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